51°F & Rain 7 day forecast Saturday, October 25, 2014

Grand Valley State University's Beacon Since 1963, Allendale, MI
  • Facebook Logo
  • Twitter Logo
  • Youtube Logo
  • e-mail Logo

Equilibrium: Portions matter

By LAUREN WILTSHIRE
Updated: 02/10/13 5:51pm

For one of my classes this week at Grand Valley State University, we watched a short 10-minute video on how advancing smart phone technology plays an important role in the medical field.
One physician in the film has a $199 device that is not only capable of performing echocardiograms without electrodes, but also doubles as a way to track his blood-glucose levels before each meal.

It’s innovations like these that always blow my mind. Not only will this device, as it becomes more commonly used, change the lives of doctors; the lives of the patients will be changed, too.

Think about it – if we had easy access to a device that would allow us to monitor own own blood-glucose level before each meal, we could also, then, proactively monitor the contents of our meals to ensure balance and by association, give ourselves a daily reminder to be live a healthier life.

Because sometimes, that is all we really need — the occassional pick-me-up, or a daily reminder that it is possible to stay in shape in a world as chaotic as our own.

But first, here’s a recipie to dip fruit in; I like it with apples, but I imagine bananas would be tasty, too:

You simply mix 1/2-cup peanut butter with 1/2 cup, Greek plain or vanilla, non-fat yogurt. Eat away! While peanut butter is high in calorie, it has great Omeg-3 fatty acids and is packed with protein. It is a great for lowering cholesterol, too. Greek yogurt is also packed with protein, about 12g per 6oz, 140 calories. This dip adds some texture to your fruit and will keep you fuller, longer. It is easy to store and stays good for about a week—if you can keep it in your house that long! Altogether, it costs less than $5 and I got five snacks out of it—with heaping servings.

Secondly, here are some simple, healthy snack ideas that will keep you energized throughout your busy day:
My first one is simple to make, I pop a piece of whole-wheat toast into the toaster, when it’s ready I spread some peanut butter and add freshly sliced bananas. This is great post-workout because it has protein, carbohydrates, and sugars and tastes good! Chocolate milk is also great for you post-work out. It contains sugars, proteins, and carbohydrates that need to be replenished after an intense gym session. Somewhere in the midst of delicious dinner recipies and yummy dips, I think we sometimes forget that portion control plays a big part in creating healthy habits – especially in those erratic student schedules, where we sometimes skip meals until our stomachs roar in a quiet lecture hall.

The trick is eating smaller meals every three hours – it helps you more successfully manage your portion control. For example, a piece of meat should only be 4 ounces – about the size of a deck of cards – and the vegetable sides should take up the majority of your plate, as often as possible.

Another key to maintaining balanced portions is to focus on the meal when you eat it. Stay away from the T.V. and other electronics, and take a moment to sit down, and take in the flavors slowly. Don’t forget to always drink water while eating.

If any readers out there have some suggestions for keeping your portions under control, email me at lwiltshire@lanthorn.com and start a conversation.

“Let the refining and improving of your own life keep you so busy that you have little time t criticize others..”—H. Jackson Brown Jr.
-L

Published February 10, 2013 in Equilibrium

Comments powered by Disqus