GV Lanthorn Editorial

The reality of the broke college student trope

As tuition and housing rates continue to increase, so does the age-old joke about the poor college student. The reference to being a 'broke college student' continues to be commonly referenced as students trash-pick old furniture, eat ramen and donate to BioLife for spending money. To struggle financially while getting a degree has almost become a rite of passage that builds character for those on the brink of adulthood.  All jokes aside, evidence shows that more than a quarter of college students are experiencing actual poverty, often in the form of hunger. Many students find themselves to be food insecure, unsure where their next meal will come from.

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GV Lanthorn Editorial

Drunk driving: if you see something, say something

Even though we have been told to avoid it at all costs from the time we were young, people everywhere, every day, are still choosing to drive drunk. According to the National Highway Traffic and Safety Association (NHTSA), even though fatalities from drunk-driving have fallen in the past few decades, drunk driving crashes still claim more than 10,000 lives every year. It is baffling that with all of the tragedies, consequences and possible means of transportation that thousands are still choosing to drive under the influence of alcohol. Is it merely the convenience that pushes drivers to get behind the wheel? Perhaps it is time that the friends of these drivers begin stepping in to stop these crashes from happening

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GVL Editorial

The need for mental health education

National Depression Screening Day was Oct. 4 and Grand Valley's Counseling Center took part in screening students' mental health. The screenings served as a way to educate the community about the traits that may indicate a mental health concern and how to respond and treat them. The importance of this education can often be lost on those who believe their lack of mental health problems exempt them from knowing the warning signs. Now more than ever, it is imperative that everyone becomes educated on mental health to prepare themselves for future concerns from themselves or loved ones. 

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GVL Editorial

Cannabis for college students

Though the use of marijuana is often associated with poor grades and general laziness, it’s worth it to consider which aspects of cannabis use can actually help students with their academic performance as well as potentially improve sleep quality and reduce anxiety. 

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GVL / Archive

Why students lack in voting engagement

Several instances in past elections have demonstrated how the youth vote can make a difference between a blue or red state. In 2008, under-30 voters helped win Barack Obama Indiana, North Carolina and Virginia. Without the youth vote in these states Obama would have potentially lost the entire election to opponent Mitt Romney. This is just one example that establishes young adult voters as a major subset of the electorate. 

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GVL / Sheila Babbitt

High enrollment rates both a blessing and a curse

In 2016, Grand Valley State University saw record-breaking enrollment rates, and the university has continued to see large groups of incoming students with each passing school year. Approximately 4,380 students were welcomed to Grand Valley in fall 2016, with the enrollment for the 2018-2019 year falling a few hundred short at about 4,000.  Grand Valley has managed to maintain one of Michigan's highest freshman enrollment rates with GVSU's current total enrollment standing at 24,677 students. This continued growth has also seen an increase in diversity at the university. This year student enrollment has increased six percent in number of students of color. Grand Valley President Haas is hopeful for the increase in enrollment rates to continue to translate to higher graduation rates. 

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GVL / Archive
Former nursing student Meghan Jordan (2014)

New nursing college approach helps all

Grand Valley State University’s Kirkhof College of Nursing is taking on a refreshing new approach to how applicants are accepted into the program. The new holistic admissions process looks more into the individuals skills and values rather than academic standing alone. The nursing program at Grand Valley is arguably one of the most difficult programs to get into, requiring a minimum grade point of average of 3.5. 

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