policy

GVL / Ben Hunt

Parkland high school shooting survivor talks safety and reform at GV

A year after the infamous shooting at her high school in Parkland, Fla., survivor Samantha Fuentes visited Grand Valley State University to provide her story and  perspective about gun violence in American schools. On Feb. 27, she sat on a discussion panel with several faculty members from GV’s College of Education. The event titled ‘Safe Learning Environments for our Students’ was held in Loosemore Auditorium on the Pew Campus and explored the various questions of ethical safety in schools.

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Students getting food at Kleiner Commons. GVL / Andrew Nyhof

Board of Trustees approves housing, meal plan price increases for 2019-20 school year

Friday, Feb. 8, Grand Valley State University’s Board of Trustees approved price increases for on-campus housing and meal plans for the 2019-2020 academic year. The unanimous vote increased housing costs by $17 per semester and main meal plan costs by $50 per semester. The total increase was 2.2 percent, a $1.2 million increase overall.  The decision by the board was reached following reviews of GVSU’s tuition costs, as well as the costs of facility operations and student employment. Each year, the board addresses the housing and dining rates in February and tuition rates in July. The July date gives the administration time to factor in enrollment numbers for the fall in calculating tuition rates it proposes to trustees.

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Courtesy / GVPD

GVPD presents Stop the Bleed seminars

Created in 2013 by the American College of Surgeons after the Sandy Hook tragedy, Stop the Bleed attendees will learn to control bleeding by direct pressure, wound packing and the use of tourniquets. They will also learn to identify life-threatening bleeding and how to take further action depending on the location of the wound. According to research cited by the Stop the Bleed campaign, about 40% of trauma-related deaths are caused by uncontrolled bleeding, making it one of the leading causes of preventable death.  

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Courtesy / The Wall Street Journal

Marijuana legalization calls for ACES resource expansion

The legalization of marijuana took effect on Dec. 6, 2018, allowing Michiganians who are 21 or older to carry 2.5 ounces of pot on their person and use it at their leisure in private areas. It gives permission to gift the mentioned weight to another over the age of 21. Included in these changes, many of marijuana’s laws are similar to the Minor in Possession laws with alcohol.  Yet, this change did not take place at Grand Valley State University. Due to the university’s federal funding, the use of marijuana is still prohibited on campus, but isn’t something offenders can be arrested for. 

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GVPD checks a suspicious vehicle on Saturday October 28, 2017. GVL / Emily Frye   

As GVSU grows, GVPD expands patrol in downtown Grand Rapids

As the Laker community continues to grow in the big city, Grand Valley Police Department recognizes the subsequent need for increased security. GVPD now has two officers on duty near the Grand Rapids campuses, the first step in their plan to establish a downtown GVPD unit.  Upon the opening of Finkelstein Hall in fall 2018, GVPD assigned officer JP West to patrol the Grand Rapids campuses weekdays between 7 a.m. and 3 p.m. Starting this week, officer Andrew Dusendang will start his new job patrolling in the evening.

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courtesy / gvsu.edu

Laker Guardian hosts app logo design contest

In an effort to increase the utilization of Grand Valley State University’s “Laker Guardian” app, Grand Valley Police Department is running a logo design contest open to all current GVSU students.  “This contest will allow our students to showcase their talents — not only for those going into visual arts and media, but those students who design or draw as a hobby,” said GVPD Sgt. William O’Donnell. 

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Distracted driving: Michigan city bans phone use for drivers

Beginning Friday, Feb. 15, drivers in Battle Creek, Mich. are likely to get pulled over if they are caught using a phone while driving, regardless if the driver is actually texting or not. Drivers in violation of the new law could be issued a civil infraction and fined $100 for the first offense or $200 for the subsequent offenses. 

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