What to take away from Michigan’s fight for water

Living in the Great Lakes State has made many of us take water for granted. We’re surrounded by a shocking 21 percent of the Earth’s fresh water, which means we never have to deal with shortages unlike the rest of the world and even the rest of the country. In the last week or so, many of the residents in Michigan have been protesting the increase in the amount of water allowed to be pumped by Nestle because they are worried about its consequences. Those people are right to be worried, but there is an even bigger problem at hand.  

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Clear backpacks not the solution to gun violence

Following the massacre that left 17 people dead, new safety measures have gone into effect at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School (MSD). These safety measures include identification badges, barricades, bag checks and, most controversially, a requirement for students to carry clear backpacks. Since these measures have gone into effect, many Douglas students have shared their frustrations, and their message is plain and simple: Clear backpacks are not a solution to gun violence in schools.  

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Student senate wise to vote against smoking-ban proposal

Growing up, I was always told that smoking is bad, so when I first read the headline “Student senate votes against proposal to ban smoking on campus,” I was genuinely surprised. At first, I couldn’t think of a single reason to continue to allow smoking, but then I thought a little longer and I appreciated student senate’s choice. 

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Advertisers need to ditch the age-old sexism

Recently, I came across a campaign series by Saint Hoax, a Syrian artist and sociopolitical activist. The campaign, called “Making America Misogynistic Again,” is a collection of old, sexist advertisements whose original headlines have been replaced by quotes that President Donald Trump has said about women. All of the advertisements are classic examples of the misogynistic advertisements of the 1950s and 1960s, and Trump’s quotes fit them almost immaculately. 

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When are we old enough to have an opinion?

In the last few weeks, we have seen an uprising in opinions, demonstrations and protests by the youth of this country. To me, this change is both welcomed and encouraged, but to others, these new voices seem to be disruptive and useless. Children, teenagers and young adults have finally decided to speak up, and instead of being commended for doing so, they are told they are just too young to have an opinion. So, my question is, what age is the right age to start speaking up? 

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The benefits of screen time

Is screen time always a bad thing? I guess that’s a subjective question in itself, but from the majority of news stations, parents and professionals, the answer seems to be overwhelmingly “yes."

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Column: Lanthorn writer's guide to the 2018 National Championship game

Sadly, the greatest month in all of sports has come to a close. This March has been one of the maddest in recent memory, featuring many buzzer beaters; the one overall seed getting blown out by 16-seed UMBC; and 11-seed Loyola-Chicago making a shocking run to the Final Four with phenomenal ball movement, excellent shooting and possibly a little divine help from above.

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Why health insurance should be a priority

As the self-proclaimed greatest country in the world, the U.S. is still falling short on a handful of things that any great country should provide. One of those things is universal health care. Fortunately, in 2010, with the enactment of the Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as Obamacare, our government made an effort to make health care accessible to all. The problem is that even with this signed into law, many people still find health care to be unaffordable and unrealistic. That has to change. 

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